Welcome to TheOhioOutdoors
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Login or sign up today!
Login / Join

INCREASED CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE TESTING IN THREE NORTHWEST OHIO COUNTIES

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
2,680
120
USA
INCREASED CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE TESTING IN THREE NORTHWEST OHIO COUNTIES


FINDLAY, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is asking white-tailed deer hunters in portions of Wyandot, Marion, and Hardin counties to submit samples of harvested deer for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing. Testing is voluntary but highly encouraged.
CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects deer populations. A CWD-positive wild Ohio white-tailed deer was recently identified in Wyandot County. The Division of Wildlife will implement its CWD response plan, which includes enhanced surveillance in 15 townships in the surrounding area, to monitor for the disease.
Additional testing will be available for those who take a deer during the weekend gun season, Dec. 19-20, the muzzleloader season, Jan. 2-5, 2021, and all remaining controlled hunts on Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area. Hunters in the following townships are asked to submit deer for CWD testing free of charge.

Wyandot County
  • Antrim, Crane, Eden, Jackson, Mifflin, Marseilles, Pitt, Richland, and Salem townships
Hardin County
  • Goshen Township
Marion County
  • Big Island, Grand, Grand Prairie, Montgomery, and Salt Rock townships
Harvested deer can be taken to the Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area Headquarters, located at 19100 County Highway 115, Harpster 43323. Wildlife professionals will be on-site to sample deer from 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. Questions can be directed to 1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543).
Hunters are asked to provide their confirmation number from the game check process as well as the location where the deer was taken (the address of the property or nearest road intersection are acceptable). The process should take no more than 10 minutes. Hunters are strongly encouraged to complete the game check process prior to arriving.

Each sample will be provided a unique specimen number which can be used to check results in approximately eight weeks. Results can be found under the District Two Enhanced Surveillance Results tab on the Chronic Wasting Disease page at wildohio.gov.
Hunters who plan to take their harvested deer to a taxidermist do not need to submit a sample at Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area. However, please call 1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543) with the harvest location and taxidermist name, and a sample will be collected from the taxidermist for testing.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there is no strong evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans. However, hunters are encouraged to wear rubber gloves when field dressing deer and avoid consuming high-risk tissues such as the brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils, and lymph nodes.

Hunters should dispose of carcasses by double-bagging any high-risk tissues and including them in household trash to be delivered to a landfill. Those who hunt out-of-state can help prevent the spread of CWD by following carcass regulations and not bringing high-risk tissues across state lines.
The Division of Wildlife has conducted routine surveillance for CWD since 2002, testing more than 25,000 deer without finding a CWD positive deer in the wild herd. CWD has previously been detected at captive deer breeding facilities in Ohio. Find more information about Ohio’s CWD surveillance at wildohio.gov.
CWD has been detected in 26 states and four Canadian provinces. The disease was first discovered in the 1960s in the western U.S. More information about this disease is available at cwd-info.org.

The mission of the Division of Wildlife is to conserve and improve fish and wildlife resources and their habitats for sustainable use and appreciation by all. Visit wildohio.gov to find out more.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.

-30-
Editor’s Note: A map of the 15 townships included in the enhanced surveillance efforts is included with this release. Please credit the Division of Wildlife.


Source: https://ohiodnr.gov/wps/portal/gov/...ews/cwd-testing-three-northeast-ohio-counties
 

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
2,680
120
USA
Perhaps ONDR should implement a mask mandate, 6' social distancing, two week isolation and a curfew for all the deer within those hotspot counties.

Seriously though, I thought this information was important enough to pass along for those that might not be aware.
 

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
2,680
120
USA
Published on December 15, 2020

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife has identified a positive test for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a wild Ohio white-tailed deer in Wyandot County. The Division of Wildlife is gathering additional details about the adult male deer taken by a hunter on private property. Tissue samples were submitted for testing by a taxidermist and the positive test was identified after results were obtained on Thursday, December 10, 2020.

CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer and other similar species, including mule deer, elk, and moose. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no strong evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans.

The Division of Wildlife will implement its CWD response plan, which includes enhanced surveillance within a 10-mile radius of the CWD positive deer location in Wyandot County. Mandatory deer disease sample collection will occur on all remaining Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area controlled hunts. Hunters who harvest a deer in Wyandot County during the remaining deer hunting season, which closes on Sunday, February 7, 2021, will be contacted to obtain disease samples by Division of Wildlife staff.

The Division of Wildlife has conducted routine surveillance for CWD since 2002, testing more than 25,000 deer without finding a CWD positive deer in the wild herd. CWD has previously been detected at captive deer breeding facilities in Ohio. Find more information about Ohio’s CWD surveillance at wildohio.gov.

CWD has been detected in 26 states and four Canadian provinces. The disease was first discovered in the 1960s in the western U.S. More information about this disease is available at cwd-info.org.

Hunters should take precautions when handling and processing any harvested deer. Hunters may have a harvested deer tested at the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for a small fee. Call (614) 728-6220 for more information.

End of article. Article courtesy of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Full article can be found here: https://ohiodnr.gov/wps/portal/gov/.../confirmed-positive-cwd-in-one-ohio-wild-deer

Source: http://cwd-info.org/oh-tissue-sampl...hronic-wasting-disease-in-one-wild-ohio-deer/
 

giles

Village idiot and local whore
Supporting Member
31,681
190
In a bar
Some things about these article bug me. Not that this isn't important or not valuable. I just see it as somewhat misleading. Using words like "fatal". Ummm, you can only test dead subjects. Obviously the deer reached a mature level to get to a taxi. Following protocol, the taxi submitted a sample. No other reasons given for why this deer was tested. This deer could've been living a perfectly happy life. It also doesn't say how old the deer is. Couldve been 10, could've been 2. But this disease is listed as fatal. 🤔

I've stood on the bleachers for years on here yelling about this and EHD. I recently started having my doubts about CWD. I've gone as far as having private conversations with Joe about changing formats to make "EHD" and "CWD" searches keywords. So this isn't just me being argumentative. I have grown extremely doubtful of reporting facts lately.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Big_Holla
Some things about these article bug me. Not that this isn't important or not valuable. I just see it as somewhat misleading. Using words like "fatal". Ummm, you can only test dead subjects. Obviously the deer reached a mature level to get to a taxi. Following protocol, the taxi submitted a sample. No other reasons given for why this deer was tested. This deer could've been living a perfectly happy life. It also doesn't say how old the deer is. Couldve been 10, could've been 2. But this disease is listed as fatal. 🤔

I've stood on the bleachers for years on here yelling about this and EHD. I recently started having my doubts about CWD. I've gone as far as having private conversations with Joe about changing formats to make "EHD" and "CWD" searches keywords. So this isn't just me being argumentative. I have grown extremely doubtful of reporting facts lately.
.
 
Some things about these article bug me. Not that this isn't important or not valuable. I just see it as somewhat misleading. Using words like "fatal". Ummm, you can only test dead subjects. Obviously the deer reached a mature level to get to a taxi. Following protocol, the taxi submitted a sample. No other reasons given for why this deer was tested. This deer could've been living a perfectly happy life. It also doesn't say how old the deer is. Couldve been 10, could've been 2. But this disease is listed as fatal. 🤔

I've stood on the bleachers for years on here yelling about this and EHD. I recently started having my doubts about CWD. I've gone as far as having private conversations with Joe about changing formats to make "EHD" and "CWD" searches keywords. So this isn't just me being argumentative. I have grown extremely doubtful of reporting facts lately.

The taxidermist we took Jenna's buck to said that last year the DNR made him submit samples all season for CWD. This year he expected the same but they must have been satisfied with the results. Now that a wild deer was found he and I would imagine it will ramp up and soon be most if not all taxidermists. Sure makes you wonder how long CWD has really been around in our deer herds and only in the last several years has it become a big deal. Like in Michigan tuberculosis has been occasionally found in a large area for decades yet every September the news reports make it sound like it's a new discovery and that people should really be careful to the extent of not even hunting the area. The CWD news reports were of zombie like deer running around the last couple years, always in September before hunters hit the woods.
 
  • Like
Reactions: giles

giles

Village idiot and local whore
Supporting Member
31,681
190
In a bar
I think it was @Chancegriffis that posted about a roadkill buck the other day. What county was that in? I would imagine every roadkill buck will look the same in these target areas.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Big_Holla