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Anyone going to jump in now that the season is all but over????

Bowkills

Active Member
546
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37
Nw oh
#1
I tried making a trad Bow last season and put many failures or learning experiences under my belt. I need to know what the hell a bow feels like before going any further. I have a decent amount of year old Osage staves for future attempts. But I'm going to order a cheap bow tonight or tomorrow to get shooting for fun mostly but in hopes a a bucket list deer. Anyone else thinking about it?
 
Likes: triple_duece

OHIOOutdoors2

Active Member
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Unknown
#3
Is it too late to bail off the train?

In all seriousness...

Have fun and get ready to practice a lot. It makes for some very fun hunts. Got to learn to be patient and wait for YOUR shot and know YOUR limit. I look forward to following along
 
Likes: finelyshedded

Bowkills

Active Member
546
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37
Nw oh
#7
image.jpeg
My package came today. I wanted something I could shoot off my hand to start learning with or else I'd ordered a sage. I'll have to get some decent arrows to know I'm in the ballpark just to practice. If this pulls 50lbs I was way freaking off a starting point of floor tillering a self bow. I can see why They broke so this was a good purchase just to learn what a bow feels like.
 

Chass

Active Member
2,177
1,200
52
The Hills
#12
I got a bear a few years ago. Man is it tough. I wish I had the knowledge to tune it properly. Other than fiddling until I'm insane I just dont know. It doesnt seem right, and I cant tell ya if it's the arrow spine or the twists in the string or if it's just me. Quite a bit of vibration, arrows will occasionally veer way off course to one side or another. I did buy some different heavier arrows, I still need to cut them down and try them out. Maybe once it gets a little warmer.
 
2,421
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Licking Co.
#13
tuning a traditional bow isn't complicated, but it does require more time and effort than most people realize, or perhaps are willing, to put in it to get it right. only three things to consider. bow, arrow, shooter. incorrect arrow spine is probably the biggest tuning problem beginners have. most likely because the guy at the pro shop who sold you arrows doesn't know a thing about traditional archery. uses a chart to provide you with proper arrows based on whatever you can tell him bout your bow and yourself. second biggest issue is a tie, in my head, between brace height and gripping the bow properly.

it's important to know exactly how far you draw your traditional bow and exactly what the weight is at YOUR draw length, which is probably shorter than you think if you are accustomed to shooting a mechanical bow with 80% letoff. Just because factory bow is marked 50# @ 28" does not mean that is what it actually is. could be 2-3 lbs more or less than how it's labeled. could be dead on, too, but it helps a lot to know all of these things before you buy arrows.
 
498
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Athens
#14
If anyone is thinking about making the plunge, this is the bow I bought a little over a year ago when I started. I got it for like $120 on sale. Best money I have ever spent.

https://www.lancasterarchery.com/galaxy-sage-elite-62-takedown-recurve-bow.html

I have ordered a new recurve but I'm not parting with this cheap Sage. Too much sentimental value. I shot damn near daily for almost a year and killed two deer with it. You can't get a whole lot cheaper for a new bow that will put meat in the freezer.
 

Bowkills

Active Member
546
1,239
37
Nw oh
#15
If anyone is thinking about making the plunge, this is the bow I bought a little over a year ago when I started. I got it for like $120 on sale. Best money I have ever spent.

https://www.lancasterarchery.com/galaxy-sage-elite-62-takedown-recurve-bow.html

I have ordered a new recurve but I'm not parting with this cheap Sage. Too much sentimental value. I shot damn near daily for almost a year and killed two deer with it. You can't get a whole lot cheaper for a new bow that will put meat in the freezer.
U are an inspiration for sure! Did you get multiple arrows and just test what shot the best?
 
Likes: Creamer
498
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Athens
#16
U are an inspiration for sure! Did you get multiple arrows and just test what shot the best?
I bought a test pack of shafts from 3 Rivers Archery and a field tip test pack. So, I had three shaft spines and like 6 different tip weights to play with. My arrows fly really well, but the mistake I made on the first round was that I didn't pay attention to arrow weight. My arrows from this first year were on the light side.
 
Likes: OHIOOutdoors2

OHIOOutdoors2

Active Member
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Unknown
#17
It’s amazing what fletchings can do to perfect arrow flight. The first time I shot bare shafts I was amazed with the poor performance of the “trad” arrows I bought at pro shop per their recommendation compared to arrow setups that I have dialed now.

Like Creamer mentioned above I’d recommended the bare shaft kit 3 rivers has with a variety of field point weights. Or even better find a buddy that has already been through it
 
Likes: Creamer

jagermeister

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
15,457
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147
Ohio
#19
I bare shaft tuned by buying full length arrows at 400 spine, adding the point/insert/footing weight that I wanted, and then shot at the target to see which way it came out of the bow. In the target nock-left... too weak. Cut off a 1/8th inch off the back of the arrow and shoot some more. Repeat until you find the sweet spot where it centers up. Obviously consistency and patience is very important during this process. But very much worth the effort. The ability to shoot bare shafts makes arrow flight simply remarkable when you add the feathers.