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Flint

Dannmann801

*Supporting Member*
8,451
9
38
Springboro
#1
What does flint look like?
How do you find it?
How big do you usually find it?

I could Google it I'm sure but I'm feelin' lazy, plus I'd like to hear some tips/experiences from people who know...
 

Ohiosam

*Supporting Member*
8,766
24
38
Mahoning Co.
#2
I find flint in the fields but they are usually smaller then a golf ball. It can vary in color but most of what I find is gray. It has a smooth look to it, where it is broken it looks flaked or faceted.

There are places in southern ohio where you can get big pieces of it.
 

RRJJ

Removed by Request.
14,062
0
0
#4
I find flint in the fields but they are usually smaller then a golf ball. It can vary in color but most of what I find is gray. It has a smooth look to it, where it is broken it looks flaked or faceted.

There are places in southern ohio where you can get big pieces of it.
This is also my experience. Additionally, you can take two pieces of flint and strike them together and it should create a spark. This can also be accomplished with a piece of steel and a piece of flint. I can remember spending hours as a kid going through my parents driveway searching for flint...of course at that time I wanted to be an Indian when I grew up.
 

rgecko23

*Supporting Member*
7,466
0
0
Massillon, Ohio
#5
This is also my experience. Additionally, you can take two pieces of flint and strike them together and it should create a spark. This can also be accomplished with a piece of steel and a piece of flint. I can remember spending hours as a kid going through my parents driveway searching for flint...of course at that time I wanted to be an Indian when I grew up.
I did too, then the whole riding a horse with no underwear kind of bothered me.....LOL
 

CJD3

*Supporting Member*
10,771
54
48
NE Ohio
#12
I have found pieces the size of my thumb nail in open field type areas but I would think stream beds would also offer small samples.
What do you need it for?
 

Mike

*Supporting Member*
10,896
88
48
Wood Co.
#13
Open fields are your best bet. If you find flakes and pieces that have a bulb of percussion, it proves that they were struck by human hands which is pretty cool if you ask me.
 

jagermeister

*Supporting Member*
13,904
59
48
Ohio
#15
Open fields are your best bet. If you find flakes and pieces that have a bulb of percussion, it proves that they were struck by human hands which is pretty cool if you ask me.
This may be a dumb question, but what do you mean by "bulb of percussion?" I find flint in fields pretty often... I'd probably keep more of it if I knew what I was looking at LOL.
 

Schu72

Senior Member
3,432
17
38
Streetsboro
#16
When I was younger I used to go arrowhead hunting with my grandparents. We used to have coffee cans full of flint in the sheds and garages. It's quite plentiful on the eastern side of the state.
 

Mike

*Supporting Member*
10,896
88
48
Wood Co.
#17
This may be a dumb question, but what do you mean by "bulb of percussion?" I find flint in fields pretty often... I'd probably keep more of it if I knew what I was looking at LOL.
Here is the scientific definition:
In lithic analysis, a subdivision of archaeology, a bulb of applied force (also known as a bulb of percussion or simply bulb of force) is a defining characteristic of a lithic flake. When a flake is detached from its parent core, a portion of the Hertzian cone of force caused by the detachment blow is detached with it, leaving a distinctive bulb on the flake and a corresponding flake scar on the core. Bulbs of applied force may be distinctive, moderate, or diffuse, depending upon the force of the blow used to detach the flake, and upon the type of material used as a fabricator. Generally, the harder the material used as a fabricator, the more distinctive the bulb of applied force.
In other words, look for what you see in the pic below. The bulb is at the area of impact. Try it with the bottom of your next empty beer bottle.
 

Dannmann801

*Supporting Member*
8,451
9
38
Springboro
#18
Great reply swantucky. :smiley_clap:

Like CJD asked Dan, what ya got planned with the flint?? :smiley_chinrub:
Oh, I'm familiar with Flint MI....once had a short-lived but steamy friendship with a woman there. Yee Haw!:smiley_coolpeace:

What am I going to do with it? see if I can spark it to start a fire. It's on my list of things to do so I can say I've done 'em....
 

jagermeister

*Supporting Member*
13,904
59
48
Ohio
#19
Here is the scientific definition:


In other words, look for what you see in the pic below. The bulb is at the area of impact. Try it with the bottom of your next empty beer bottle.
Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhh....



Yea, clear as mud. lmao Just kidding, man... thanks for the explanation!