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Dog proof traps

RedCloud

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Crawford
#1
I took some pictures of the dog proof traps I was using and thought I would start another thread just for showing what they are.

Trap Master Dog Proof Traps.







The inside NOT set



Inside of trap SET



And this is what it looks like SET



They do work.

 
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Redvette

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#2
I used Duke DPs this last season and loved 'em. Never set a 1.5 coil for 'coon but did have an area where they were hit by other ctitters ,(but not caught). I had baited them with cheap cat food and salmon oil on the top edge and on cat food inside. The area where they were hit they were pulled out of the ground ,(2 set withing 10 yards of each other), and I think it was a coyote.
 

RedCloud

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#5
The coon don't take much time to polish the dye off them traps do they.
I tried some walnut hulls this past year. First catch and they are polished.

Russ
You can see the next to last pic is what it use to look like lol. She definitely shined it up a bit lol. As I was walking up to her in that trap she was biting at it and growling pretty good lmao. Just makes the hair on the back of your neck stand on end lol.
 

Buckrun

Junior Member
#6
I used speed dip mixed with Coleman white gas. on them. They kind of looked crappy but they didn't rust i guess. I used the same stuff on some Conibear traps. I didn't like it because it made them to slick. They wouldn't stay set I had to scrape it off all the triggers.
 

Redvette

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NW Ohio
#9
I have no experience using them, but I like that there's no room for the coon to chew at the toes below the jaw.
Yep Badger, I've used 'em now for 2 years and prefer them over 1.5 to #2 coiled jaw traps or double jaws that prevent a chew out. Only negative,(if you consider it a negative), is you won't be suprised by in inadvertant fox or coyote that messed with it and got caught like happens with leg holds. I normally will not buy Dukes but the new Duke DP is great and has a better anchor shaft than the Griz. IMO
 

badger

*Supporting Member*
#10
Yep Badger, I've used 'em now for 2 years and prefer them over 1.5 to #2 coiled jaw traps or double jaws that prevent a chew out. Only negative,(if you consider it a negative), is you won't be suprised by in inadvertant fox or coyote that messed with it and got caught like happens with leg holds. I normally will not buy Dukes but the new Duke DP is great and has a better anchor shaft than the Griz. IMO
I have heard nothing but good about the Duke DP's. I'm giving some serious thought on picking up a dozen this summer. I have a place that has coon issues but there's also people that run hounds there for fox. Well they don't actually run fox, they just put on the English hunting outfits and saddle up and turn the hounds loose. More of a reenactment type thing. I avoid setting footholds and snares at this spot, and the DP's would be great there.
 

RedCloud

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#11
This last time I used some corn I had left over. I just dropped some down into the bottom of the DP and around on the ground. I only had to use a handful. I think as long as you can put it on the waters edge or a coon trail you won't have to use a lure to get them to put their paws in or find it since it's right there in their faces. They just can't help but play around with it lmao.

As soon as I get some cash saved up I will be going on a shopping spree and adding these to the arsenal for sure.
 

RedCloud

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#13
I could Google it but I would rather have your guys answer... Why dye the traps opposed to others methods?

Beentown
I'm not sure on this one. I only know they dye it just to help camoflage it instead of having that BRIGHT steel color although, I don't think it matters all that much with coon. (at least the ones I have come into contact with)

The traps are also sometimes dipped in wax to help protect aginst rust.

Maybe one of the more seasoned guys can give us both the answer and we will learn something new :D.
 
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Beentown

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#16
I get that but why dye when you could use other methods? Is dying it the best way? Just seems there are so many other ways to get rust prevention and scent control.

Beentown
 
#17
Sorry I havent been around in a while. Really busy.

The speed dip, I used it to help stop rust. You are suspose to let the traps rust a little to help the stuff stick to the trap. It looked like a type of tar that is thinned with Coleman white gas fuel. Then they are left to dry and air out for a couple days.

It did help stop rust. I never use to do anything to my traps when I was a kid trapping. I thought when I got back into it I would try to protect the traps since they are getting quite old. Am using the same ones that I have had for 30+ years. Plus a lot of them were old used traps when I got them.

I never get rid of anything. Ask Hicks he has been over and saw some of my collection. Never know when I may have a mid life crises!
 
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badger

*Supporting Member*
#18
Conventional dying is more of a tradition to me than a need in some ways. If I'm land trapping canines, I feel a clean trap with a good coat of wax will cover the the scent department. No need for dye as the trap is buried under ground and nothing can see it. If I were to buy a new dozen land traps, I would boil off the factory oil and just wax them with clean wax. Why rust them to get a coat of dye that the animal can't see? Normally you would get a light coat of rust on the traps to get your dye to stick. I don't see a reason to start the rust process in the first place. I have a lot of old traps that will get dyed every season just because I love the look of them, but as I have went through the years I don't see too many reasons behind it. With that said I can't stand to set a bright silver trap in the water wether it's at a pocket set or a blind set for any critter. My water traps have to be camo in some fashion. So yes, I will still boil, dye and wax all my water traps. I would just use spray paint on the footholds (I do on my conis) but you can't wax a spray painted trap. Wax is your best friend on land for scent, and your best friend to prevent rust in the water. To any of you with limited experience I would advise against waxing any body grippers (conis)
I have dipped parts of 110's in wax with good results but would never wax a large coni like a 330. You are just asking for trouble.
 

RedCloud

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#19
Conventional dying is more of a tradition to me than a need in some ways. If I'm land trapping canines, I feel a clean trap with a good coat of wax will cover the the scent department. No need for dye as the trap is buried under ground and nothing can see it. If I were to buy a new dozen land traps, I would boil off the factory oil and just wax them with clean wax. Why rust them to get a coat of dye that the animal can't see? Normally you would get a light coat of rust on the traps to get your dye to stick. I don't see a reason to start the rust process in the first place. I have a lot of old traps that will get dyed every season just because I love the look of them, but as I have went through the years I don't see too many reasons behind it. With that said I can't stand to set a bright silver trap in the water wether it's at a pocket set or a blind set for any critter. My water traps have to be camo in some fashion. So yes, I will still boil, dye and wax all my water traps. I would just use spray paint on the footholds (I do on my conis) but you can't wax a spray painted trap. Wax is your best friend on land for scent, and your best friend to prevent rust in the water. To any of you with limited experience I would advise against waxing any body grippers (conis)
I have dipped parts of 110's in wax with good results but would never wax a large coni like a 330. You are just asking for trouble
.
Very nice right up badger.

I heard waxing the body gripping traps does set you up for problems just because they make them very touchy and more likely to be set off on ones hand if they happen to bump it ?

I have also heard that the reason for waxing land traps is so that they glide through the dirt easier and thus makes them faster to catch your critters ?

A lot of things to learn but I tell you...it's priceless info and well worth the effort to know these things IMO :D.

Thank you fellas for taking the time to help out us newbie trappers. I appreciate the help.