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OHIOOutdoors2
06-24-2017, 09:16 PM
What do we know about it? Can you tune an already fletched arrow?

From what I have read and watched Easton FMJ seems to make a pretty decent arrow. So I ordered Easton FMJ 6mm arrows already fletched & full length. Anything I need to do?

"J"
06-24-2017, 09:27 PM
My experience is make sure the vains/fletching line up with the blades of the broadhead....

Milo
06-24-2017, 10:25 PM
There isn't much to it but to spine match all the arrows, adjust the mating surface with broadhead to ensure a clean spinning arrow and tune your bow.

OHIOOutdoors2
06-24-2017, 11:14 PM
Okay cool, thanks

Just 1 More
06-25-2017, 07:14 AM
You tune your bow, not your arrows....
Lining fletchings up with the broadhead is an old wives tale,, maybe in the old days it mattered but, not today.
The biggest factors are:
Proper spine for the bow poundage and shaft length
Broadheads spin true on the shaft
Fletch clearance at the rest and riser

After you're bow is in specs, ATA, Brace, cam timing etc.. Then you can bare shaft tune, paper tune and then broadhead tune. If your broadheads and field points are hitting relatively close, you can skip all but the broadhead tuning. This means getting your broadheads and field points hitting the same point of impact on the target. There are some good You Tube videos of how to do this. AND NO, it's not moving your sight to where the broadheads are hitting.

"J"
06-25-2017, 09:05 AM
Old habits are hard too break...

Just 1 More
06-25-2017, 10:55 AM
Old habits are hard too break...

Certainly nothing wrong with doing it, in fact, if you do it right, you can get the ferrells lined up better in the shaft and eliminate broadhead wobble .. which can be part of the tuning process

Milo
06-25-2017, 11:11 AM
Certainly nothing wrong with doing it, in fact, if you do it right, you can get the ferrells lined up better in the shaft and eliminate broadhead wobble .. which can be part of the tuning process
I'm curious about your "if you do it right " comment on aligning broadhead blades with vanes ... explain please... or did I misunderstand you

Just 1 More
06-25-2017, 06:00 PM
I'm curious about your "if you do it right " comment on aligning broadhead blades with vanes ... explain please... or did I misunderstand you

More so about the ferrells than the blades... Arrow squaring tool, hot melt glue, keep it hot while rotating in the shaft to insure even spread of glue,,,, just basic stuff

Milo
06-25-2017, 07:14 PM
Have you used the low temp hot melt? I would never recommend what you proposing with the high temp hot melt as it would damage the carbon shaft

Just 1 More
06-26-2017, 06:49 AM
Have you used the low temp hot melt? I would never recommend what you proposing with the high temp hot melt as it would damage the carbon shaft

I've always heard you can damage carbon shafts with high heat, In 20+ years of doing it, I guess i've never applied enough heat to find out. Never had an issue with hurting the carbon, except when they hit a solid object.
I'll usually get the insert nice and hot, I use an old bladeless muzzy screwed in to it and apply most of the heat to the muzzy and the insert, get a good coating of Bohning Ferr-L-Tite Hot Melt or Eastons hot melt, whatever I have on hand at the time, and spin it as I insert it in to the shaft. I do like to get the shaft a little warm also.
I always make sure to clean the inside of the shaft, even run a wire bore brush in there to scuff the inner surface a little.

bowhunter1023
06-26-2017, 06:55 AM
There isn't much to it but to spine match all the arrows, adjust the mating surface with broadhead to ensure a clean spinning arrow and tune your bow.

This.

I will add that when building my hunting arrows, I weigh ALL components and batch materials so that I build a set of arrows that have all arrows within +/- 2-3 grains, or as close as possible to this threshold.

Beentown
06-26-2017, 07:03 AM
Cold melt glue is TITTIES.

jagermeister
06-26-2017, 07:16 AM
This.

I will add that when building my hunting arrows, I weigh ALL components and batch materials so that I build a set of arrows that have all arrows within +/- 2-3 grains, or as close as possible to this threshold.
Same here. I don't know whether it makes much of a difference, for an average archer like myself, but I know it satisfies the OCD part of me. Lol

bowhunter1023
06-26-2017, 07:22 AM
Same here. It settles that little voice in the back of my head that wonders what else I could have done. What other variable can I eliminate. It's easy to slap shit together and get arrows that are 6-7 grains out. Add in a fixed blade head, a bow slightly out of tune, a cold morning and some buck fever and that arrows that's out of sync with the rest might just nosedive or bounce off a back rather than find its mark.